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Relational-Systemic Psychotherapy

Programme

  • Credits: 60 ECTS (30 ECTS/per year).
  • Type of programme: Taught course (some on-line seminars).
  • Calendar: From September to June (2 academic years).
  • Course venue: University of Deusto in Bilbao.
  • Faculty: Faculty of Psychology and Education.
  • Timetable: One day a week from 16:00 to 20:00 (seminars) and two Fridays a month from 9.30 to 13.30 and from 15.00 to 19.00 (workshops and lectures). And, on occasion, Saturdays.
  • Language of instruction: Spanish.
  • Number of places: 25
  • Qualifications: Master’s degree in Relational-Systemic Psychotherapy (official Spanish diploma).

Master’s Final Project

Students prepare an empirical research project

The project focuses on demonstrating students’ knowledge of research techniques and methodology and their ability to apply them to a specific subject, fulfilling the requirements for a psychology research project. The Master’s Final Projects for the Master’s programme in Relational-Systemic Psychotherapy entail introducing the research in clinical practice through suitable methodologies.

  1. Orientation seminar. Prior to writing the Master’s Final Project, students attend a seminar to define their research/intervention proposal.
  2. Selection of the MFP theme. This may not necessarily be related to the student’s internship centre. 
  3. Assignment of a tutor/faculty advisor. Students will be assisted and supervised as they develop their MFP.
  4. Development of the MFP. Students attend tutorials to receive orientation, support and supervision of their work on the MFP. During this process, students have the right and responsibility to attend individual face to face or online tutorials. Students are required to submit a MFP progress report to their tutor midway through the process and the final draft to be read and approved.
  5. Exposition and defence. Students may proceed to the public defence of the project before the examining board once they have elaborated and submitted it.
  6. Students are required to have a minimum mark of 5 in all the other subjects in order to defend their Master’s Final Project before the examining board.

 

Research areas and themes

Areas

The Master’s Final Project may focus on one of the following:

  1. Understanding of the mechanisms by which families affect the individual's symptoms (the dynamics of interactions, attachment, emotional nurturing, sibling rivalry, interparental conflict, filio-parental conflict, violence, emotional regulation, etc.). How families, individuals, marriages and broader systems function will be analysed in a variety of contexts, focusing on systemic and/or relational-dynamic processes.
  2. Understanding of the factors through which family intervention programmes can have a positive effect on addressing individual problems (evidence-based intervention) and study of effective and efficient intervention to address problems associated to the different family structures, cultural reference points and in community contexts (schools, the justice system, basic social security services, city services) and clinical attention (context of social, outpatient or hospital assistance).
  3. Research, as established by the American Psychological Association (APA)'s division on family, alarming issues such as gender violence, violence to parents or child abuse, the increase in drug use, the ageing population, relationship conflicts, custody assessment, the impact of mental illnesses and serious or chronic illnesses on families, difficulties associated with ethnic groups and diversity.

Themes

These themes centre on 10 research areas related to the Master’s degree programme and which students may choose from to elaborate their Master's Final Project:

  1. Interparental conflict and divorce. Impact on children’s physical and mental health. The different family members’ roles: parents, siblings.
  2. Efficacy and effectiveness of psychotherapeutic interventions.
  3. Family violence. Violence against women, filio parental violence.
  4. Family and health. Celiac disease, eating disorders, neuromuscular and neurodevelopment disorders.
  5. Substance and non-substance additions in family contexts. Drug use, emotional dependence, gambling.
  6. Immigration. Transnational immigrant families.
  7. Family, psychopathology and well-being. Nurturing, marital relations, adjustment and adaptation, psychosocial risk.
  8. Attachment and pre and postnatal relationships. Pregnancy, assisted reproduction, reflection skills and awareness.
  9. Adoption. Communication concerning origins, health, attachment, infant and youth well-being, expression of emotions.
  10. Family psychological assessment in clinical and healthcare contexts.

Each year, the topics connected to the previous research areas will be announced.

Programme

  • Credits: 60 ECTS (30 ECTS/per year).
  • Type of programme: Taught course (some on-line seminars).
  • Calendar: From September to June (2 academic years).
  • Course venue: University of Deusto in Bilbao.
  • Faculty: Faculty of Psychology and Education.
  • Timetable: One day a week from 16:00 to 20:00 (seminars) and two Fridays a month from 9.30 to 13.30 and from 15.00 to 19.00 (workshops and lectures). And, on occasion, Saturdays.
  • Language of instruction: Spanish.
  • Number of places: 25
  • Qualifications: Master’s degree in Relational-Systemic Psychotherapy (official Spanish diploma).

Master’s Final Project

Students prepare an empirical research project

The project focuses on demonstrating students’ knowledge of research techniques and methodology and their ability to apply them to a specific subject, fulfilling the requirements for a psychology research project. The Master’s Final Projects for the Master’s programme in Relational-Systemic Psychotherapy entail introducing the research in clinical practice through suitable methodologies.

  1. Orientation seminar. Prior to writing the Master’s Final Project, students attend a seminar to define their research/intervention proposal.
  2. Selection of the MFP theme. This may not necessarily be related to the student’s internship centre. 
  3. Assignment of a tutor/faculty advisor. Students will be assisted and supervised as they develop their MFP.
  4. Development of the MFP. Students attend tutorials to receive orientation, support and supervision of their work on the MFP. During this process, students have the right and responsibility to attend individual face to face or online tutorials. Students are required to submit a MFP progress report to their tutor midway through the process and the final draft to be read and approved.
  5. Exposition and defence. Students may proceed to the public defence of the project before the examining board once they have elaborated and submitted it.
  6. Students are required to have a minimum mark of 5 in all the other subjects in order to defend their Master’s Final Project before the examining board.

 

Research areas and themes

Areas

The Master’s Final Project may focus on one of the following:

  1. Understanding of the mechanisms by which families affect the individual's symptoms (the dynamics of interactions, attachment, emotional nurturing, sibling rivalry, interparental conflict, filio-parental conflict, violence, emotional regulation, etc.). How families, individuals, marriages and broader systems function will be analysed in a variety of contexts, focusing on systemic and/or relational-dynamic processes.
  2. Understanding of the factors through which family intervention programmes can have a positive effect on addressing individual problems (evidence-based intervention) and study of effective and efficient intervention to address problems associated to the different family structures, cultural reference points and in community contexts (schools, the justice system, basic social security services, city services) and clinical attention (context of social, outpatient or hospital assistance).
  3. Research, as established by the American Psychological Association (APA)'s division on family, alarming issues such as gender violence, violence to parents or child abuse, the increase in drug use, the ageing population, relationship conflicts, custody assessment, the impact of mental illnesses and serious or chronic illnesses on families, difficulties associated with ethnic groups and diversity.

Themes

These themes centre on 10 research areas related to the Master’s degree programme and which students may choose from to elaborate their Master's Final Project:

  1. Interparental conflict and divorce. Impact on children’s physical and mental health. The different family members’ roles: parents, siblings.
  2. Efficacy and effectiveness of psychotherapeutic interventions.
  3. Family violence. Violence against women, filio parental violence.
  4. Family and health. Celiac disease, eating disorders, neuromuscular and neurodevelopment disorders.
  5. Substance and non-substance additions in family contexts. Drug use, emotional dependence, gambling.
  6. Immigration. Transnational immigrant families.
  7. Family, psychopathology and well-being. Nurturing, marital relations, adjustment and adaptation, psychosocial risk.
  8. Attachment and pre and postnatal relationships. Pregnancy, assisted reproduction, reflection skills and awareness.
  9. Adoption. Communication concerning origins, health, attachment, infant and youth well-being, expression of emotions.
  10. Family psychological assessment in clinical and healthcare contexts.

Each year, the topics connected to the previous research areas will be announced.